Welcome to the Aurantia Chapter DAR

California DAR

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The Aurantia Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, was organized on December 10, 1905. Aurantia was the six hundred ninety-fourth chapter of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution and the ninth chapter to organize in California. Riverside, California, birthplace of the sweet, seedless, Washington Navel orange,  was the "centre of the greatest orange growing district in the world," according to the local advertising literature when Aurantia Chapter organized.  The name Aurantia, meaning golden, was chosen from a botanical name for the orange tree Citrus Aurantium. 

Early Riverside Postcard

Eliza Tibbets planted the first two Washington Navel orange trees at her home in Riverside. The Parent Navel Orange Tree pictured below on the left, was moved to Low Park, on the southwest corner of Magnolia and Arlington, in 1902, and is marked as California State Historical Landmark no. 20. The other Parent Navel Orange Tree was transplanted in the courtyard of the Glenwood Mission Inn by President Theodore Roosevelt on May 8, 1903. That tree died in 1922 and was removed in 1923.

California Historical Landmark No. 20the second Parent Washington Navel Orange Tree

The minutes of the January 9, 1924 Aurantia Chapter meeting record the presentation of a gavel made of wood from the Parent Navel Orange Tree that had stood in the courtyard of the Mission Inn.  It was presented by two chapter members, Marion Clark Miller and Alice Miller Hutchings. A motion to add a  silver plate with an inscription to the gavel passed on June 14, 1926. This gavel is still in use by our chapter and one of our most treasured possessions.

 

Inscription on the gavel reads:

“Wood of Parent Navel Orange Tree

Aurantia Chapter, DAR Riverside, California

From Frank A Miller, 1924”

 

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